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Though it is a relatively recent field of study, women's history is inscribed across all of the Harvard Library holdings gathered since 1638. By examining those holdings afresh and querying them in a new and feminist light, the curators of Women Working have aggregated thousands of items that illuminate women's history. The result is a unique, virtual collection, comprising over 650,000 individual pages from more than 3,100 books and trade catalogs, 900 archives and manuscript items, and 1,400 photographs. Women Working, 1800–1930 is a digital exploration of women's impact on the economic life of the United States between 1800 and the Great Depression.

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The Encyclopedia of Pennsylvania Biography was published irregularly from 1914 to 1967 by the Lewis Publishing Company. Biographies profile thousands of prominent Pennsylvanians who contributed to the development of the Commonwealth in many fields of endeavor. The online version offered by Penn State contains ONLY the volumes of the Encyclopedia known to be in the public domain (the first 14 volumes published before 1923). Additional volumes are available in the Penn State University Libraries' collection. Search The CAT to determine the location of the print volumes. To locate other libraries that have copies, consult OCLC WorldCat, where you can search many libraries at once for an item and then locate it in a library nearby.

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An image database of historically significant documents, manuscripts, photographs and related graphic materials from public and private collections in the San Fernando Valley. It provides full, open and equal access to materials demonstrating the socio-economic changes and cultural evolution of the San Fernando Valley from the early 19th century through the end of the 20th century.

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Introduction The Ann Arbor District Library, the University of Michigan University Library and the U-M’s Bentley Historical Library have entered into a partnership to create The Making of Ann Arbor, an online, public website on the history and development of the Ann Arbor community. MOAA is an illustrated narrative about Ann Arbor from its pioneer days when it was part of Michigan Territory to the early twentieth century. The project draws upon the three libraries’ resources and the expertise of all three partners to build a website of interest to the citizens of Ann Arbor. In addition to the illustrated narrative history of our city, the website has a searchable image database, including many photographs and other visual images not used in the narrative.

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The pamphlets digitized here comprise a very small part of a much larger collection of pamphlets owned by the Labadie Collection on the topic of anarchism. In order to maintain a simple way for the project to continue, the pamphlets were chosen for this project in call number order, rather than by level of intellectual or historical significance. These pamphlets were first cataloged in 1982 with funding from the NEH using local subject headings and call numbers. Later, the pamphlets were added to the University of Michigan Library's online catalog MIRLYN , making them much more widely accessible. It is our intention to eventually digitize the remainder of the pamphlets as time and resources permit. Currently, there are almost 600 pamphlets available online.

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aking of America (MOA) represents a major collaborative endeavor to preserve and make accessible through digital technology a significant body of primary sources related to development of the U.S. infrastructure. With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation , MOA seeks to involve research institutions and national consortia to develop common protocols and consensus for the selection, conversion, storage, retrieval, and use of digitized materials on a large, distributed scale. The initial phase of the project, begun in the fall of 1995, focused on developing a collaborative effort between the University of Michigan and Cornell University .

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Contact Please send all inquiries and submissions to FragmentsJournal@gmail.com The editorial board is pleased to announce the establishment of Fragments , a new, open-access and peer-reviewed journal, which will be published by MPublishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library. The journal's first articles were published in July 2011. Fragments will provide a forum for dialogue and exchange between scholars in all fields of the humanities and social sciences who study the premodern world. The journal encourages scholars to pursue subjects of broad interest to colleagues working in other places and times, and to pursue comparative and connective approaches in investigating the past.

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The Court Rolls of Ramsey, Hepmangrove and Bury, 1268-1600 The court rolls of Ramsey, Hepmangrove and Bury constitute a distinctive collection of primary sources for examining and exploring the lives of ordinary people and the institutions of a rural community in the East Midlands of medieval England from the end of the 13th century to the beginning of the 17th century. They were previously published on microfiche as part of The Court Rolls of Ramsey, Hepmangrove and Bury, 1268-1600 , edited and translated by Edwin DeWindt and originally published by the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies (Toronto) in 1990 as vol. 17 of the Subsidia Mediaevalia series (ISBN 0-88844-366-8).

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Center for Japanese Studies: Motion Pictures Reprint Series The University of Michigan has one of the largest faculties for Japanese in the United States. As part of its charter to disseminate advanced research and foster new possibilities for pedagogy, the Publications Program has inaugurated a unique reprint series on Japanese cinema. The site includes monographs, essay collections, journals, billets, and even digitized films. Abé Mark Nornes, Editor

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Volume 15, 2011 : Families & Transitions Michigan Family Review (MFR) is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary publication of the Michigan Council on Family Relations (MiCFR) and focuses on professional application and scholarly inquiry. Traditionally, MFR has been published once a year with each volume highlighting a single theme. MFR provides a forum for a wide range of professionals and others interested in strengthening family life. Readers and contributors include educators at many levels in several fields, social service staff, researchers, attorneys, medical and health personnel, clergy, and public policy makers, as well as practitioners in community and citizen-action groups, and family members themselves.

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Winter, 2007 Welcome to Post Identity 's searchable article database. Post Identity is an international, fully-refereed journal of the humanities. It features text-based and multi-media scholarship that problematizes the narratives underlying individual, social, and cultural identity formations; that investigates the relationship between identity formations and texts; and that argues how such formations can be challenged. If this is the first time you have explored Post Identity , we invite you to visit the journal's home page at http://liberalarts.udmercy.edu/pi/ Post Identity produced nine issues between 1997 and 2007.

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The Proceedings of the Western Society for French History publish selected, peer-reviewed papers from the Society's annual meeting. Founded in 1974, the Western Society for French History seeks to promote the study of French and Francophone history.

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Yul phyogs so soʾi gsar ʾgyur me loṅ The Tibet Mirror (Tib. Yul phyogs so so'i gsar 'gyur me long) was published from 1925 to 1963 in Kalimpong, and chronicles the most dramatic social and political transformation in Tibet during a time when vernacular writing was relatively scarce and a Tibetan media practically non-existent. The paper also relayed information about World War II, the independence of India, and other global news to Tibetan readers in Lhasa, Gyantse, Kham, etc., and to traders and aristocrats who frequently traveled from Lhasa via the Chumbi Valley to Kalimpong, Darjeeling and Calcutta.

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Interest in the Middle East and the Islamic world is at an all time high, generating a corresponding increase in demand for specialized teaching, learning and transmitting critical knowledge and perspectives on this part of the world. Understanding this region involves learning about the social, political, religious and cultural issues – past and present – that shape the Islamic world of today. Studying Middle Eastern cultures and peoples across all time periods provides a crucial framework for understanding the complex relationship between Islam and the West today.

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Tufts College: Graduates in Wartime Welcome to Tufts College: Graduates in Wartime , the third exhibit in a series created by the Tufts University Digital Collections and Archives. This exhibit explores the transition many Tufts College students made from student to Naval Officer during the fighting of World War II. This online exhibit was created in conjunction with an exhibit on display in the Tisch Library from January until September 2002. The physical exhibit was designed and mounted by Tatiana Sizonenko, and the web exhibit was created by Patricia Hughes G2000. The entire series of exhibits has been funded by a committee of alumni and veterans of the U.S.

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Somerville/Cambridge Latino Community History Project The Somerville/Cambridge Latino Community History Project documents the arrival and integration of the Latino community in Somerville and Cambridge, Massachusetts through interviews, recorded oral histories and field research. Tufts undergraduate students in Deborah Pacini Hernandez's Anthropology 183 class Urban Borderlands, working in conjunction with Latino high school students from Somerville's Welcome Project and Cambridge's Ahora program, have been exploring the history and development of Latino communities in the area.

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History of Medicine Introduction The history of medicine tells different stories and different truths depending on the questions we ask and the concerns we raise. That's why there is always something new in the past. This exhibition explores some of the multiple meanings people have found in the history of medicine within the United States. We see how, during the last two hundred years, the history of medicine has been created and used as weapon, as inspiration, as edifice, as politics, as profession, and as today's news. Physicians have used medical history to increase their understanding, to unify their profession, to develop a vision of the future of medicine, and to provide better medical care to their patients. History is like a kaleidoscope.

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Cornell Modern Indonesia Collection Professor George Kahin's introduction to the first "Interim Report" describes the concerns and intentions of CMIP's editors. Prof. Kahin noted that, "With respect to much of the research carried out in post-revolutionary Indonesia, there has been a lag of two to three or more years between the termination of field work and the first publication describing the results of this work" and " ... the delay has been particularly regrettable inasmuch as the extent of research [on Indonesia] being undertaken is so limited." For this reason, the editors proposed to invite researchers to make their findings available in a provisional form, as CMIP "Interim Reports," or working papers, before the publication of their finished books.

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Indonesia is a semi-annual journal devoted to the timely study of Indonesia's culture, history, government, economy, and society. It features original scholarly articles, interviews, translations, and book reviews. Published since April 1966, the journal provides area scholars and interested readers with contemporary analyses of Indonesia and an extensive archive of research pertaining to the nation and region. The journal is published by Cornell University's Southeast Asia Program . All articles and reviews published in Indonesia prior to April 2000 are available at no cost. Online access to single issues and individual articles published within the last five years are available for a fee.

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About the Project Introduction aking of America (MOA) represents a major collaborative endeavor to preserve and make accessible through digital technology a significant body of primary sources related to development of the U.S. infrastructure. Funded originally by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation , MOA sought to involve research institutions and national consortia to develop common protocols and consensus for the selection, conversion, storage, retrieval, and use of digitized materials on a large, distributed scale. The initial phase of the project, begun in the fall of 1995, focused on developing a collaborative effort between Cornell University and the University of Michigan .

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About the Project Welcome to Cornell University Library's web site on issues of race, ethnicity and religion. The incentive behind the project was provided by the interest expressed in 2004 by University President Jeffrey S. Lehman, the Provost, the Vice Provost, the Cornell University Librarian and the Cornell University Press in collaborating on a web-based project that would facilitate informed study and discussion of issues related to race, ethnicity and religion on the Cornell campus and in the U.S. In its initial pilot phase (Nov.

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Cornell Vicos Collection About the Vicos Collection The Program represents an optimistic view of both the possibilities for and the benefits of change. The contemporary North American view emphasized the importance of agricultural productivity as a means to improve closed, ignorant, impoverished communities such as Vicos. In addition, the social science of the time stressed the essential relationship between economic development national integration. The Vicosinos would exercise the duties of citizenship in exchange for the rights that the Peruvian nation afforded them. Evaluations of the Cornell-Peru Program describe it as a qualified success.

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From June through October 1973 and briefly during the spring of 1974, John H. White, a 28-year-old photographer with the Chicago Daily News , worked for the federal government photographing Chicago, especially the city`s African American community. White took his photographs for the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) DOCUMERICA project.

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Inside the National Archives Southeast Region 1. Welcome The Southeast Region of the National Archives holds in trust original records documenting the settlement and development of a unique section of the United States. It maintains historical records from regional offices of Federal agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. These records are the documentary evidence of day-to-day occurrences that have become part of our history. This presentation highlights treasures in the region's holdings. It tells intriguing stories of the people who once inhabited this land. Some documents are about famous people and events.

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This exhibit highlights the contributions of the thousands of Americans, both military and civilian, who served their country during World War II. Documents from the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis form the core of the exhibit. For those who lived through the Second World War, this exhibit may help them recall their experiences. For those who did not, it is hoped they will gain a deeper understanding of the sacrifice and commitment of those Americans who, after almost four years, were "A People at War."

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Last Updated: 19/03/2004 Disclaimer: This website is best viewed with a monitor resolution of at least 1024x768. eMail: victoriantimes@cdlr.strath.ac.uk Victorian Times is funded by the New Opportunities Fund (NOF) under their digitisation funding strand. � Centre for Digital Library Research, University of Strathclyde, 2003-2009

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This site provides information on the 250-year relationship between Moravian missionaries and the Inuit of Labrador. This interaction led to the establishment of settlements for a formerly nomadic people, their conversion to Christianity and exposure to aspects of North American culture. The information has been gathered from a variety of sources that shed light upon this unique adventure. Read more

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Lillian Frow Peacock & Eunice Peacock Merrick Collection Considered the pioneers of society in Coconut Grove, Miami, Florida, the Frow and Peacock families settled in the tropics in the late 1800s and left a legacy of history and town character that persists to this day. Both John Frow and his son Simeon served as keepers of the Cape Florida Lighthouse, the famed embattled site of adventure and strife from Seminole Indian War attacks, in 1859 and 1868 respectively. Also the first person to buy property in Coconut Grove, John and his brother Joseph, who worked as John's assistant at the lighthouse, stood on the initial board to establish a school for the Coconut Grove district.

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Gregory Bush Community Studies Oral Histories Professor Gregory Bush (History Department) and the Institute for Public History (IPH) have recorded a series of interviews around the issue of public spaces in South Florida. Participants, who are representative of the diverse cultural milieu of the region, reflect and provide insights on migration, gentrification, the history of individual neighborhoods, housing, and community services. These voices help to articulate the ongoing discourse on public space as it applies to South Florida?s History of development. The recordings and accompanying transcripts of the oral history collection document the unique experiences of the region?s inhabitants.

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Toronto is celebrating its 175 th anniversary by engaging the community to a number of events. The city’s celebrations include museum tours, literary reading and book launches, music, art, festivals and a song competition. In celebration of this anniversary, Toronto Public Library invites you to explore Toronto's past with material from the Special Collections at the Toronto Reference Library. Click on each image below to explore. To learn more about the history of Toronto, explore these past exhibits: Also, check out the following two books from our Curator's Showcase : To search for more historical images of Toronto from our collections:

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