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the archive The archive of the Jack Lenor Larsen textile company reveals time and again that the driving force behind this influential company has always been the principal that art need not be separated into high (or fine) art and low art (or craft). The Larsen Design Studio created modern, artistic fabrics for interior use, yet their innovations with handwovens, batiks and fabrics in scale with modern architecture have changed the industry. Artistic and technical explorations are the cornerstones that have kept the company on the front edge of the market for half a century. the web site Larsen: A Living Archive was created in conjunction with the exhibition Jack Lenor Larsen: The Company and The Cloth at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

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  The Art of Daily Life There is no equivalent in the many Native American languages for the word art . Yet the objects here suggest that Native Americans are a highly spiritual people who create objects of extraordinary beauty. In Native American thought there is also no distinction between what is beautiful or functional, and what is sacred or secular. Design goes far beyond concerns of function, and beauty is much more than simple appearances. For many native peoples, beauty arises from living in harmony with the order of the universe.The concerns and aspirations of a vital contemporary American Indian population changes as the world changes.

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About Calisphere Calisphere is the University of California's free public gateway to a world of primary sources. More than 200,000 digitized items — including photographs, documents, newspaper pages, political cartoons, works of art, diaries, transcribed oral histories, advertising, and other unique cultural artifacts — reveal the diverse history and culture of California and its role in national and world history. Calisphere's content has been selected from the libraries and museums of the UC campuses, and from a variety of cultural heritage organizations across California. See the list of contributing institutions. Calisphere is a public service project of the California Digital Library (CDL).

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Soon after their appearance in the 1840's, stamps became the focus of collectors. They developed a life of their own, apart from their official role on letters and parcels. Canada's first stamp, the Three penny Beaver, designed by Sandford Fleming, was printed in 1851. Thirteen years later, Canada's first philatelic pamphlet, The Stamp Collector's Record, was published in Montreal, only a year after a similar one in England. Stamp collecting's appeal is universal. With a vast array of stamps available, collectors tend to narrow their scope to specific categories-concentrating for example on stamps with certain themes, or from particular countries. Governments try to tempt collectors (and generate revenue) by issuing a host of stamps and stamps sets.

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A selection of 290 postcards from the Florida Postcard Collection covering Miami, Miami Beach, Coconut Grove, Coral Gables and other South Florida locations from the University of Miami Libraries Special Collections.

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Theodore Bolton Collection Theodore Bolton was a librarian, art historian, and artist. Bolton received a diploma in the arts from that Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, in 1915. He studied library science at the same institute, receiving a diploma in that subject in 1924. He pursued formal academic work later in his life as well, receiving in 1937 a B.S. in education, and a M.A. in education in 1940, both from New York University. Thereafter, he received an M.F.A. from Columbia in 1955. In addition, he studied at Harvard during the summers from 1937 to 1939. Upon his retirement, Bolton and his wife moved to Coconut Grove, Florida. Theodore Bolton died at his Coconut Grove home on Friday, December 7, 1973.

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Hollar was born in 1607, the son of an upper middle-class civic official. Very little is known about his early life, but he evidently learned the rudiments of his craft by age eighteen, left his native Prague at age twenty, and likely studied in Frankfurt under Matthaus Merian. His first book of etchings was published in 1635 in Cologne when Hollar was twenty-eight. The following year he came to the attention of the renowned art collector the Earl of Arundel who was making an official visit to the continent, and Hollar subsequently became a part of his household, settling in England early in 1637. He remained in England during the beginning of the English Civil War period, but left London for Antwerp in 1642, where he continued to work on a variety of projects.

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This collection features approximately 4500 full page plates and other significant illustrations of human anatomy selected from the Jason A. Hannah and Academy of Medicine collections in the history of medicine at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto. Each illustration has been fully indexed using medical subject headings (MeSH), and techniques of illustration, artists, and engravers have been identified whenever possible. There are ninety-five individual titles represented, ranging in date from 1522 to 1867.

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AGNES CHAMBERLIN In addition to the original paintings the Chamberlin digital collection also includes early editions of Canadian Wild Flowers and two editions of Studies of Plant Life. The story of how Canadian Wild Flowers came to be published is a fascinating one and throws considerable light on the state of publishing in Canada at the time, as well as on the determination and talent of Agnes herself. When her husband died in 1865 Agnes was left with very limited means, and set to work to supply illustrations for thirty of the flowers described in Mrs. Traill's manuscript, depicting them in ten groupings. Having secured five hundred subscribers for the work, she then found there was no lithographer in Toronto willing to undertake the printing.

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About FADIS FADIS (Fine Art Digital Imaging System) is a content management system designed for the teaching, studying and researching of art, architecture and visual culture. FADIS combines the digital management of electronic resources with a courseware system and provides an intuitive interface that reflects higher educational teaching needs. The goal of FADIS is the creation of a shared common repository amongst participating institutions. FADIS is currently free to any participating institution contributing content to the collection.

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Portraits in Oxford * An integrated digital catalogue of portraits in the University of Oxford and its constitutent colleges. Portrait collections include: The collections: Welcome to Portraits in Oxford The Portraits in Oxford project aims to publish an integrated digital catalogue of portraits in the University of Oxford and its constituent Colleges. The pilot study, (June 2005-May 2006), catalogued portraits in the Examination Schools of the University, and at Pembroke College. The catalogue of the University portrait collection is on Open Access and can be searched using the search facilities at the top of this page. The integrated catalogue of University and College portraits is available to registered users.

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This website, dedicated to the work by women artists in the collections of Washington University, was developed in 2001-2002 with the support of a grant from the Sam Fox Arts Center at Washington University in Saint Louis. The project was developed in concert with a course, "L01-3631 Creative Women: Modern Artists and Writers," co-taught in the Spring of 2002 by Elizabeth C. Childs, Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology, and Helen Power, Senior Lecturer in Women's Studies. Betha Whitlow, Curator of Visual Resources in the Department of Art History and Archaeology, supervised the design and implementation of the site in consultation with Professor Childs and Dr. Sabine Eckmann, Curator of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.

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Terra Incognita: An Online Exhibition This exhibit features early printed accounts of exploration and cultural encounters between what is known as the Old World or Europe and the New World or the Americas. The people on both sides of these encounters viewed the people they met through the screen of their culture and how they perceived the world, including their myths, legends, and religious beliefs. Both sides often had to reconfigure and rebuild their idea of the world with this new knowledge. The results yielded much knowledge and discovery but also misunderstanding, fear and violent attempts to control various groups.

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During the depths of the Great Depression of the 1930s and into the early years of World War II, the Federal government supported the arts in unprecedented ways. For 11 years, between 1933 and 1943, federal tax dollars employed artists, musicians, actors, writers, photographers, and dancers. Never before or since has our government so extensively sponsored the arts. MORE... This link is not functional because your browser does not support JavaScript or Javascript has been disabled. Please use this link to MORE...

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This site presents digital reproductions of images from the University Archives and from rare books and manuscripts held by the Cornell University Library. The images are delivered via Luna Insight® image browser . Please adjust your browser to allow pop-up windows before attempting to launch the collection. If you continue to experience technical difficulties, please report your problem to vrhelp-l@cornell.edu . For reference questions, please complete our reference form . For questions or comments about this website, send E-mail to rmcweb@cornell.edu .

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The Johnson Museum has one of the finest collections of art in New York State and is recognized as one of the most important university museums in the country. Spanning the history of art, the Museum's collections are especially strong in Asian art, nineteenth- and twentieth-century American art, and the graphic arts.

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About - Oregon Percent for Art Background When an artist applies for a Percent for Art award, the Oregon Arts Commission (OAC) requires that (s)he submit slides, 8 x 10 black and white prints or 35mm negatives of their artwork, along with textual documentation describing the materials used in creating the work. In addition, some artists choose to submit illustrative proposals or project mockups. Many applicants also provide an artist statement as well as an exhibition list or resume. These materials are then reviewed for artist merit and suitability to the facility.

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& Welcome to the Fine Arts Print Collection website, a collaborative venture of the , and the . The Print Collection is part of the Fine Art Collection, owned by the Department of Art and managed by the Fairbanks Gallery at Oregon State University. Web and software support has been provided by the staff of the Valley Library. Use the Search or Browse features to view items in the collection. Throughout your search, you can get help with search functions by clicking the help link in the top navigation bar. Customize options for search results, My Favorites, Compare and Slideshow views. View, compare, delete and move collection items you have saved to My Favorites within CONTENTdm.

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History of Medicine Home > History Home > Lesser Home This is my fourth exhibit over the last 20 years in a series presenting medicine and social healing in our century. When I reviewed my first book, from which the first exhibit was taken (auditing medical school at UCLA, with the Class of '71), and the second, about medical education in its entirety (from the student's first days until a physician's first professional experiences, in the '80's), I realized that another look was timely. I have always focused on the motivations of health care practitioners, as well as their human endeavors. I admire those who study and train to help others at this high level of knowledge and skill, which takes years to achieve and much personal sacrifice.

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About the Collection In September 2005, UW-Madison Professor Emeritus Tse-Tsung Chow (who died in 2007) and his wife Nancy Wu Chow donated over 120 calligraphic and painted Chinese scrolls and fans, ranging from the 18th through the 20th centuries, to the Special Collections Department of the UWM Libraries. Professor Chow's collection is an invaluable addition to Special Collections, offering primary examples of Chinese culture spanning a two-hundred year period, with didactic applications in a broad range of disciplines at UWM, including art, art history, history, geography, foreign languages and linguistics, and international studies.

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Purchasing Print Issues Past issues can be purchased for $12 apiece from the Museum Store at the University of Michigan Museum of Art by contacting Store Manager Suzanne Witthoff at witthoff@umich.edu or 734.763.9051. About Bulletin The Bulletin of the University of Michigan Museums of Art and Archaeology was a joint publication of the University of Michigan Museum of Art , the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology , and the Department of the History of Art . This journal features scholarly articles related to subjects of interest to both museums, particularly their collections, exhibitions, and fieldwork programs.

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