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Category: Native American history, Connecticut

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Pittsburgh native Walter McClintock graduated from Yale in 1891. In 1896 he traveled west as a photographer for a federal commission investigating national forests. McClintock became friends with the expedition’s Blackfoot Indian scout, William Jackson or Siksikakoan . When the commission completed its field work, Jackson introduced McClintock to the Blackfoot community of northwestern Montana. Over the next twenty years, supported by the Blackfoot elder Mad Wolf, McClintock made several thousand photographs of the Blackfoot, their homelands, their material culture, and their ceremonies.

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The Collection Just under 300 engravings, watercolors, and illustrations drawn from books, archival collections, and artwork from the Beinecke Library's Western Americana and General collections. Cite as: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

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333 reads

Portraits represent various tribal groups, including, among many others, the Apache Indians, Arapaho Indians, Arikara Indians, Bannock Indians, Cherokee Indians, Cheyenne Indians, , Oglala Indians, Ojibwa Indians, Omaha Indians, Oohenonpa Indians, Santee Indians, Seminole Indians, Tohono O’odham Indians, Ute Indians, Wichita Indians, and Yuma Indians. Exterior images consist primarily of informal portraiture, as well as depicting residences and settlements, including the Crow Indian Agency in Montana, 1871; the Pawnee Indian School and buildings at the Pawnee Reserve, Loup Fork, Nebraska, 1871; and a Bannock Indian camp near Fort Hall, Idaho, 1872.

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In 1916 Elizabeth Willis DeHuff’s husband, John David DeHuff, became superintendent of the Santa Fe Indian School in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Elizabeth, twenty-four years old and educated as a teacher at Barnard College in New York, quickly became interested in the art and culture of the couple’s new home, and in the students who attended the school. DeHuff began inviting boys from the school into her home for afternoon painting lessons. Students that received training included Fred Kabotie, Otis Polelonema (both Hopi) and Velino Shije Herrera (of Zia Pueblo).

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666 reads