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: Arts & Humanities

Category: Arts & Humanities

Results 1 - 21 of 382

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Pluralism and Adaptation in the Islamic Practice of Senegal and Ghana is a digital library of multi-media resources that demonstrate how innovative Africans have been in the history of Islam and Islamic practice and how they continue to live and experience Islam.

Four digital galleries – two from Senegal and two from Ghana – emphasize pluralism - the coexistence and indeed the mutual respect among people of different religious persuasions - and adaptation – situations where Islam takes root in a particular society and culture that changes over time.

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458 reads

Ajami is the centuries-old practice of using modified Arabic scripts to write non-Arabic languages. It comes from the Arabic word for foreigner or non-Arab and is used widely throughout West Africa for both religious and secular writings.

Ajami in the Senegambia makes accessible over 20 handwritten ajami manuscripts produced by West African scholars. The texts contain insightful discussions on mutual understanding between people of different faiths, races and ethnic backgrounds in Senegambia. They capture several Senegambian Muslim scholars' views on peaceful cohabitation, moderation and non-violence that have been a prominent feature of Senegambian communities.

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514 reads

by Gracia Clark The Muslim men and women in this gallery live and work in Kumasi, Ghana. They are not professional scholars or teachers, but they are deeply interested in following the principles of Islam. Their interpretations of the requirements and values of their faith influence their behavior at home, with their neighbors and at work as traders and tailors. Muslims are a minority in their city and country, where Christianity is the dominant religious affiliation and indigenous spiritual practices remain popular. The broader community sometimes neglects their interests or discriminates against them, but they continue trying to live a virtuous life and to expand their understanding of the Koran through study groups and discussions.

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406 reads

Filipino Workers in Hawaii, 1926 FILIPINO WORKERS IN HAWAII, 1926 Photographs taken by Lt. Colonel Duckworth-Ford on an assignment to Hawaii regarding the labor conditions of Filipino laborers in Hawaii; they are described by Duckworth-Ford. The photographs show Filipino laborers and their relatives, fields and lands, water sources, plantation buildings, laborer housing and schools, store, hospital facility, labor officials. Also sugar cane planting and harvesting, cane processing equipment, cane transport.

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602 reads

Donald Angus Collection of Botanical Prints Donald Angus' collection of botanical prints are housed at the Bishop Museum, Foster Gardens, the National Tropical Botanical Garden, and the University of Hawai'i at Manoa Hamilton Library. These exquisite illustrations were published in monographs and journals mainly in the 18th and 19th centuries. They reflect the enthusiasm of scientists, and the popularity of the exotic flora being introduced and cultivated in European botanical gardens. Many prints in the Angus collection are from Monandrian Plants of the Order Scitamineae by William Roscoe (1753-1831). Roscoe, a wealthy banker and amateur botanist, founded the Liverpool Botanic Garden in 1802.

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Creating Siapo: American Samoa 1967 Welcome to    Creating Siapo: American Samoa 1967 In summer of 1966, Joan Griffis was recruited by the National Association of Broadcasters to work as an on-air teacher in American Samoa. For the next two years, she worked in Pago Pago, American Samoa, teaching English as a second language, with her lessons being broadcast to high schools on all of the American Samoan islands. She then spent an additional two years at the Feleti Teacher Training school—later the American Samoan Community College—where she and a small staff worked closely with Samoan high school students, helping them prepare for college on the mainland, while also conducting teacher training classes. In 1970, she returned to the continental United States.

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Japanese American Veterans Collection Chaplain Higuchi Wartime Correspondence During World War II, Hiro Higuchi of Hawaii volunteered to serve as one of two chaplains attached to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, an all-Japanese American unit formed in January 1943. Following his enlistment, Higuchi attended the U.S. Army Chaplain School at Harvard University in the fall of 1943. In November 1943, he joined the soldiers of the 442nd RCT for intensive training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. In June 1944, Higuchi accompanied the 442nd RCT to Europe, where he served with the unit in Italy and France. Chaplain Hiro Higuchi returned home to Hawaii in December 1945.

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  Within the vast body of literature on Asia held by the Asia Collection at the University of Hawaii are fascinating illustrations of the people of Asia and the environment in which they live. These images are a visual record of the lives of the people and their surroundings. The sheer number of illustrations makes digitizing all of them an impossible task, so we have decided to concentrate on the theme "Asia at Work." Work is the activity by which so many of us identify ourselves. The tools we use, the human interaction and cooperation that occurs in the course of its performance, and the skills we employ all, to a great extent, help define who we are. Images are arranged by country.

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426 reads

Francis W. Little House Hallway at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts (Francis W. Little House Frank Lloyd Wright, 1913-15) Unified Vision tells the story of the Prairie School through the collection of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, which includes a large group of furniture and other objects from Prairie School structures in Minnesota, Illinois, and Iowa. Featured architects include William Gray Purcell, George Grant Elmslie, Frank Lloyd Wright, and George Washington Maher. In addition, the collection includes an important Prairie School home, the Purcell-Cutts house, designed in 1913 by Purcell and Elmslie. This program offers a closer look at the Institute's objects and those who designed them, as well as an extensive tour of the Purcell-Cutts house.

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485 reads

Throughout the fall of 2004, paintings conservators Joan Gorman and David Marquis of the Midwest Art Conservation Center conducted a major conservation treatment of Guercino's Erminia and the Shepherds during public viewing hours.     In 1999, the exhibition "Restoring a Masterwork" followed the process of conserving Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione's The Immaculate Conception with Saints Francis of Assisi and Anthony of Padua .    

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455 reads

Established in 1916, the Department of Prints and Drawings at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is responsible for the care, exhibition, and acquisition of works of art on paper. These include woodcuts, engravings, etchings, lithographs, screenprints, drawings, watercolors, pastels, monotypes, multiples, artists' books, and rare books. Ranging from early 14th-century illuminated manuscripts to contemporary works on paper, the Institute's permanent collection of prints and drawings is encyclopedic in scope and comprehensive in graphic media. Featured here is a selection of more than 3800 works from the Museum's permanent collection. Try searching for an artist, title, keyword or country.

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The Minneapolis Institute of Arts' Department of Photographs includes fine historic and contemporary works that cover the history of the medium from 1839 to the present.

Featured here is a selection of more than 5200 photographs from the Museum's permanent collection, representing the work of more than 400 photographers.

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The term Modernism commonly applies to those forward-looking architects, designers and artisans who, from the 1880's on, forged a new and diverse vocabulary principally to escape the Historicism, the tyranny of previous historical styles. The foundation of this online project is a group of over 250 objects representing nine Modernist movements.

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the archive The archive of the Jack Lenor Larsen textile company reveals time and again that the driving force behind this influential company has always been the principal that art need not be separated into high (or fine) art and low art (or craft). The Larsen Design Studio created modern, artistic fabrics for interior use, yet their innovations with handwovens, batiks and fabrics in scale with modern architecture have changed the industry. Artistic and technical explorations are the cornerstones that have kept the company on the front edge of the market for half a century. the web site Larsen: A Living Archive was created in conjunction with the exhibition Jack Lenor Larsen: The Company and The Cloth at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

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Eadweard Muybridge (1830–1904) wished to catalogue every aspect of human and animal locomotion with his camera. He photographed hundreds of subjects engaged in actions both mundane and arcane: nude figures walking and lifting children, athletes boxing and fencing, and animals hurdling, kicking, or slowly ambling along. He was the first photographer to visually dissect these activities, creating images that delighted and mystified the public in the late 19th century.

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  The Art of Daily Life There is no equivalent in the many Native American languages for the word art . Yet the objects here suggest that Native Americans are a highly spiritual people who create objects of extraordinary beauty. In Native American thought there is also no distinction between what is beautiful or functional, and what is sacred or secular. Design goes far beyond concerns of function, and beauty is much more than simple appearances. For many native peoples, beauty arises from living in harmony with the order of the universe.The concerns and aspirations of a vital contemporary American Indian population changes as the world changes.

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Myths are stories that explain why the world is the way it is. All cultures have them. Throughout history, artists have been inspired by myths and legends and have given them visual form. Sometimes these works of art are the only surviving record of what particular cultures believed and valued. But even where written records or oral traditions exist, art adds to our understanding of myths and legends.

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  The diverse collections of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts include thousands of works of art that were made for worship or religious ritual. Historically, people have lavished the finest materials and workmanship on those things that represented their most deeply held beliefs. The works of art included here were selected because they illustrate the main theological concepts of the world's major religions. The texts attempt to provide concise overviews and are intended to serve as comparative teaching resources. Each entry was reviewed by a knowledgeable practitioner and/or ordained clergy of that faith.      

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The Institute's collection of Asian art represents seventeen Asian cultures spanning over 5,000 years. The Department of Asian Arts has benefited greatly from generous gifts from knowledgeable collectors. Augustus L. Searle, Alfred F. Pillsbury, Richard P. Gale, Louis W. Hill, Jr., and Ruth and Bruce Dayton have donated specialized collections of international reputation, including ancient Chinese bronzes, ancient and post-Sung jade, Chinese monochrome ceramics, Ukiyo-e paintings, Japanese prints, and classical Chinese furniture. In addition, highly regarded specialized collections of Ch'ing dynasty silk textiles, Miao textiles, and surimono prints have been built over the years. The curatorial department's goal is to provide the public with a broad overview of Asian art.

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Welcome! To St. Catherine University Digital Collections Use the Search or Browse features to view items in the collection Get help anytime by using the help link in the top navigation bar St. Catherine University Digital Collections serves as the online home for unique collections on campus. These resources are made readily accessible to students, faculty, and the general public. Current collections include visual and textual materials; other collections will be added as they become available.

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The WPA California Folk Music Project is a multi-format ethnographic field collection that includes sound recordings, still photographs, drawings, and written documents from a variety of European ethnic and English- and Spanish-speaking communities in Northern California. The collection comprises 35 hours of folk music recorded in twelve languages representing numerous ethnic groups and 185 musicians. This elaborate New Deal project was organized and directed by folk music collector Sidney Robertson Cowell for the Northern California Work Projects Administration.

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203 reads