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Video

Welcome to the Hoagy Carmichael Collection! This multimedia web site is part of an 18-month project to catalog, digitize, and preserve every item in Indiana University's extensive collections pertaining to the life and career of master songwriter Hoagland "Hoagy" Carmichael (1899-1981). Carmichael grew up in Bloomington, Indiana, and graduated from the Indiana University (IU) School of Law. He composed his enduring pop standard, "Star Dust," in Bloomington, and the story of its creation has become an integral part of local history.

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- Biomechanics of Motion Collection Description The purpose of this Biomechanics of Movement collection is to create a structure and a web based user interface for researchers and students to access and utilize video clips of human movements. This interactive digital archive resource provides a mechanism for bringing together engineers, animators, computer scientists, and kinesiologists to collectively solve meaningful real world problems fundamental to functional movement. This digital collection of movement video clips is created by members of the USC Biomechanics Research Laboratory in collaboration with USC Libraries. CITE AS: Creator. Title. Date. From the Biomechanics of Motion Digital Archive. Digitally reproduced by the University of Southern California Digital Archive.

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The website provides a visual record of changes in economic, social, and environmental life in the region as depicted in the evolving technology of photography. The time period covered in the website begins with the announcement in the Pittsburgh Gazette of the invention of a chemical process by Louis Daguerre. This process would later become known to the world as photography and would be used by generations of photographers to explore life and changes in Western Pennsylvania. “Life in Western Pennsylvania 1840-1970” is organized into three major categories:
1) Searchable database 2) Timeline 3) Section on preservation and identification of photographs. There are also sections on student activities, picture puzzles, e-cards, a teacher’s guide, and project documentation.

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The more than 50,000 volumes on Afghanistan in the ACKU collection contain works in Dari, Pashto and various western languages. The collection provides comprehensive coverage on all sectors of development, as well as literature, music and cultural heritage. Select reference works may also be consulted, an archival section of development reports from before the war is also included, as are rare Mujahideen press publications, DVDs, 2,000 BBC radio programmes and audio visual materials, such as videotapes on NGO activities among refugee populations and inside Afghanistan, historic events and anthropological documentaries.

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About LA as Subject L.A. as Subject is a research alliance dedicated to preserving and improving access to the raw material of Los Angeles history. Much of the city’s history is preserved in libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions. Other valuable and unique collections – those that reveal the stories of neighborhoods, families, and influential Angelenos – are scattered across Southern California, curated by smaller institutions and individual enthusiasts. With an online directory of more than 230 separate collections, L.A. as Subject ensures that researchers know what materials are available, where they are located, and how to access them. L.A.

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Old China Hands Archive Who is an "Old China Hand" and what is the "Old China Hand Experience?" According to A Concise Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, edited by Paul Beale, (Macmillan, 1989), this term has been in use since approximately 1910 and is applied to "One who has spent many years in China in the commercial or civil service, or as a missionary." The dictionary's definition leaves out some important categories of people, particulary the waves of refugees from the conflicts of Europe and elsewhere who found temporary shelter in China, as well as people who served in the military of many nations. It must also be expanded to point out that implicit in the term is the notion of contact between Chinese and non-Chinese cultures.

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Center for Japanese Studies: Motion Pictures Reprint Series The University of Michigan has one of the largest faculties for Japanese in the United States. As part of its charter to disseminate advanced research and foster new possibilities for pedagogy, the Publications Program has inaugurated a unique reprint series on Japanese cinema. The site includes monographs, essay collections, journals, billets, and even digitized films. Abé Mark Nornes, Editor

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About The Project The March on Milwaukee Civil Rights History Project supports understanding of the struggle for racial equality by helping users discover primary sources and other educational materials from the collections of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries and the Wisconsin Historical Society. The digital collection includes the selected papers of individuals representing a variety of positions on the civil rights issue, photographs, unedited footage from the WTMJ-TV news film archives, and oral history interviews capturing the recollections and perspectives of individuals who participated in the movement.

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History of Medicine Public Health And War Public health and war have long been close companions, and maybe strange bedfellows. Starting with the Crimean War, and then the first terrible round of "modern wars" -- the American Civil War, the Franco-Prussian War and World War I -- military officials and civilian leaders called on health professionals and volunteers to help mobilize and protect military forces and civilian populations. Health professionals and volunteers, in turn, viewed war as an opportunity to test and implement their theories, as an opportunity to use newly discovered knowledge and newly invented technologies -- and eagerly jumped on war bandwagons to advance their professional, scientific, political and ideological goals.

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History of Medicine Guide to Tropical Disease Motion Pictures and Audiovisuals Introduction The Tropical Disease Motion Picture and Audiovisual Collection is comprised of films, videorecordings, and digital videocasts produced from the 1920s through 2009, with the majority shot prior to the 1960s. All are devoted to health concerns and include material on medicine and public health. Materials range from ideological, documentary, educational, and training films to American war propaganda. The intended audience is diverse and includes military personnel, health professionals, and the general public.

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ABOUT e-ASIA The e-Asia project is funded by the University of Oregon Library through the generosity of Nissho Iwai.yella By building a collection of digitized e-books and a database of full text web resources, e-Asia strives to contribute to the research and scholarship of East Asia. While the e-Asia project is based largely on resources held at the University of Oregon Library, its purpose is neither to duplicate nor displace printed traditonal materials. Rather, by providing searchable full text, the digitalization efforts of e-Asia represent a new tool aimed at facilitating the information-gathering process.

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The three sections of It's in the Blood! A Documentary History of Linus Pauling, Hemoglobin and Sickle Cell Anemia work together to provide an unusually rich source of information on Pauling's work in blood biochemistry and molecular disease. Navigate between the sections by using either the links on the site's home page or the links at the top of any page within the site. Narrative - The first section tells the story of Linus Pauling's research into the nature of human blood.

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Linus Pauling and The Nature of the Chemical Bond: A Documentary History is comprised of three large sub-sections, each of which tells the story of the elucidation of chemical bond theory in a different way. Navigation between sub-sections may be achieved either through use of the links provided on the site homepage or through use of the links located in the header of each page within the site. Narrative - The first section - a forty-nine "chapter" Narrative - recounts the early years of chemical bond investigation primarily focusing on chemist Linus Pauling’s (1901-1994) research, which he later proclaimed as being his most important contribution to science.

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Oregon Explorer is a comprehensive digital library of Oregon's natural resources. This state-of-the-art, Web-based resource uses advanced information technology to access and integrate data from state and federal agencies, local governments, university scientists, citizens, and K-12 educators and students. It supports informed decisions and actions by people concerned with Oregon's natural resources and environment.

Through a series of geographic, data and topic-based Web portals, Oregon Explorer helps users:

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Linus Pauling and the Race for DNA: A Documentary History is comprised of three large sub-sections, each of which tells the story of the discovery of the double helix in a different way. Navigation between sub-sections may be achieved either through use of the links provided on the site homepage or through use of the links located in the header of each page within the site. Narrative - The first section - a thirty-four "chapter" Narrative - recounts the saga of the discovery from the largely unknown viewpoint of the major "loser" in the race: the phenomenal American chemist Linus Pauling (1901-1994). There are three components to each page of the Narrative.

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Mission The purpose of the UO Channel is to provide a gateway to streaming media at the University of Oregon. Programming featured on the main UO Channel site is to reflect the University’s dedication to “…the highest standards of academic inquiry, learning, and service…” Criteria include: General guidance for the UO Channel is provided by an Advisory Board with representatives from: Announcements Welcome to the 2011 UO Academic year! The UO Channel is now compatible with iOS devices: iPhone, iPad and iPod. Viewing our video on your mobile device is simple - browse to your selection, and press play!

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About Scholars' Bank Welcome to Scholars' Bank , an open-access digital repository created to capture, distribute and preserve the intellectual output of the University of Oregon. Scholars' Bank is maintained by the University of Oregon Libraries, under the coordination of Digital Library Services . Using the open-source software DSpace, available from MIT and Hewlett Packard, Scholars' Bank provides stable, long-term storage needed to house the digital products of UO faculty and researchers. If you are interested in starting a community or contributing to an existing community contact a Scholars' Bank representative at scholars@uoregon.edu .

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About this Project The purpose of this project is to use the archives of the University: documents, photographs, physical objects, and audiovisual materials - to tell the story of athletics at the University of Oregon. More than just statistics of accomplishments, this is the story of people and events that changed athletics at the University of Oregon over the past 110 years. It is also the story of athletics in higher education: the relationship and the issues involved between athletics and education over time. The project includes a collection of topics, a gallery of documents and images, and a timeline of events in the history of sports at the University of Oregon. All three areas can be expanded over time as resources permit.

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About GloPAD GloPAD (Global Performing Arts Database) records include authoritative, detailed, multilingual descriptions of digital images, texts, video clips, sound recordings, and complex media objects related to the performing arts around the world, plus information about related pieces, productions, performers, and creators. GloPAD is in a continual process of development: we have recently merged two related databases, restructured GloPAD to support our newly developed metadata standards, and redesigned the user interface. Approximately 4,500 objects are currently available, with new records added and older records revised on a daily basis.

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About Heiner Müller was born in Eppendorf, eastern Germany, in 1929 and died in Berlin in 1995. He was one of the major East German writers and indisputably the most important German dramatist (some would argue European dramatist) in the latter half of the twentieth century. His 30 plays helped reconfigure the notion of modern theatre in European and Anglo-Saxon venues and a number of his most important works (Hamletmachine, Quartett, Medea Material, The Mission) have been translated and staged in many parts of the world. Alexander Kluge was born in Halberstadt, Germany in 1932 and after earning a law degree has gone on to distinguish himself as a leading writer, cultural theoretician, film maker and public intellectual.

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About the Project Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD-Rom, DVD-Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

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About The school's highly talented and motivated students learn from 60 full-time faculty members - all experts in their chosen disciplines, and all dedicated to teaching, research and service. Learning takes place in state-of-the-art classrooms, in the on-campus Statler hotel, and in varied industry settings around the world. The result: a supremely accomplished alumni group-corporate executives and entrepreneurs who advance the industry and share their wisdom and experience with our students and faculty.

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When Judge John Sirica gaveled the trial of the Watergate seven to order on January 8, 1973, federal investigators had already discovered a covert slush fund used to underwrite nefarious activities against Democrats. The money and the men on trial could be linked to the Committee to Re-elect the President (CRP) at whose head sat the former Attorney General of the United States, and President Nixon’s former law partner, John Mitchell. At the trial, E. Howard Hunt, who had planned the break-in, and four of the burglars pleaded guilty. G. Gordon Liddy, who helped in the planning, and James McCord, the other burglar, refused to cooperate, were convicted of various charges, and sentenced to prison.

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About FADIS FADIS (Fine Art Digital Imaging System) is a content management system designed for the teaching, studying and researching of art, architecture and visual culture. FADIS combines the digital management of electronic resources with a courseware system and provides an intuitive interface that reflects higher educational teaching needs. The goal of FADIS is the creation of a shared common repository amongst participating institutions. FADIS is currently free to any participating institution contributing content to the collection.

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Marjory Stoneman Douglas (1890-1998) led an extraordinary, long life, and established herself as one of South Florida's premier personalities of the twentieth century. Douglas' importance as a female writer and reporter of both local and national significance is further impacted by her pioneering role as an environmental and political activist. As a writer and reporter she enjoyed a distinguished career first as an assistant editor for the Miami Herald and later as an O. Henry Award winning short story writer and novelist.

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Gregory Bush Community Studies Oral Histories Professor Gregory Bush (History Department) and the Institute for Public History (IPH) have recorded a series of interviews around the issue of public spaces in South Florida. Participants, who are representative of the diverse cultural milieu of the region, reflect and provide insights on migration, gentrification, the history of individual neighborhoods, housing, and community services. These voices help to articulate the ongoing discourse on public space as it applies to South Florida?s History of development. The recordings and accompanying transcripts of the oral history collection document the unique experiences of the region?s inhabitants.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection This collection contains 210 selected digital images and 3 digital videos from an archived community collection devoted to documenting one of the worst floods in Louisville's history. On the morning of August 4, 2009, record-breaking rains fell in central Louisville and surrounding counties between 7 am and 10 am EDT, with reported hourly rainfall rates as high as 8.83 inches. The Louisville Free Public Library's main branch and the University of Louisville's Belknap and Health Sciences campuses were particularly hard hit by the deluge.

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About Alaska's Digital Archives The Alaska Virtual Library and Digital Archives project is a collaborative effort initiated by the Rasmuson Library at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Consortium Library at the University of Alaska Anchorage, and the Alaska State Library in Juneau. Learn more about our partners . Now in its third phase, the initiative is funded by a congressional award and contributions from these institutions with additional support of the Rasmuson Foundation. The goal of the project is to support the instructional and research needs of Alaskans and others interested in Alaska history and culture. Initial activities focused on scanning, indexing, and placing 5,000 historical images into an online, searchable database.

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Latest News Clarence Alexander Long Time Jukebox Contributor is Honored by President Obama Submitted by admin on Fri, 10/14/2011 - 09:19 Watch Clarence's climate change interview at Stakeholders & Climate Change Bethel Communities of Memory is now available The Bethel Communities of Memory Project Jukebox features people from the Bethel area talking about life in their remote community. The original gathering took place in 1996, but many of the stories still hold true. Dog Mushing in Alaska Project Jukebox is live! The Dog Mushing in Alaska Project Jukebox website features oral histories, historic film clips, and still photographs to highlight various aspects of dog mushing in Alaska.

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In 1861 Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) became the United States' sixteenth president. But before Lincoln became the nation's chief executive, he led a fascinating life that sheds considerable light upon significant themes in American history. This World Wide Web site presents materials from Lincoln's Illinois years (1830-1861), supplemented by resources from Illinois' early years of statehood (1818-1829). Thus Lincoln/Net provides a record of Lincoln's career, but it also uses his experiences as a lens through which users might explore and analyze his social and political context. How to Use Lincoln/Net: Northern Illinois University Libraries' digitization projects rely upon financial support provided by individual donors, private foundations, and state and federal agencies.

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